Ⓐ ☭ Ⓔ
menos violencia, más orgasmos.

thepeoplesrecord:

Here are more incredible photos from Madrid today. The Spanish revolution is boiling over after harsh austerity measures on the working class were announced on Thursday. 

Thousands of protesters demanded fair wages, equal access to education, an immediate end to home evictions & more funding for basic healthcare services. 

Riot police responded with rubber bullets & arrested 22 people. More protests are expected to erupt for the rest of the week.

We stand with Spaniards fighting for basic human needs against a corrupt, greed-driven government! 

Photo 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

thepeoplesrecord:

Hong Kong backs down on China education plan after protestsSeptember 9, 2012
Hong Kong’s government withdrew plans for a compulsory Chinese school curriculum on Saturday after tens of thousands took to the streets in protest at what they said was a move to “brainwash” students.
The decision by the island’s pro-China Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying to make the curriculum voluntary for schools came a day before elections for just over half the seats of Hong Kong’s 70-seat legislature.
“We don’t want the recent controversy to affect the operations of schools, nor do we want to see the harmony of the education environment to be affected,” said Leung, noting the move was a “major policy amendment”.
“They have made a substantive concession,” said Joseph Wong, a former senior government official and political scientist.
“One may say it’s too late, but better late than never. I think it will defuse the issue, maybe not entirely, but at least it will remove a lot of the tensions … This is a great day for Hong Kong’s civil society.”
For the past week, thousands of protesters have ringed Hong Kong’s government headquarters, camped out in tents, dressed in black and chanting for the withdrawal of the curriculum they said was Communist Party propaganda aimed at indoctrinating new generations of primary and secondary school students.
The education issue is one of several key issues for voters along with housing and the increasing number of visitors from the mainland coming into the city.
DEMOCRACY CAMP
Leung was sworn in in July after being elected by a committee filled with business professionals, tycoons and Beijing loyalists. Hong Kong’s seven million people have no say in who becomes their chief executive.
A strong showing by the opposition pro-democracy camp would make it more difficult for the chief executive to pass policies in a fractious legislature.
The polls may be a chance for voters to express anti-China sentiment, with many protesters still camped outside the government headquarters after the apparent back-down, still unsatisfied with the policy change.
“This is a cunning move to put the ball in the people’s court. Even though they say schools are free to choose … in the coming years I expect the government and Beijing to use hidden means to try to pressure more and more schools to take up the scheme,” said young activist Mak Chi-ho.
“What Hong Kong needs is real universal suffrage.”
Hong Kong is a freewheeling capitalist hub which enjoys a high degree of autonomy, but Beijing has resisted public pressure for full democracy and has maintained a high degree of influence in political, media and academic spheres.
The past week’s protests have included hunger strikes and the parading of a replica of the Goddess of Democracy statue which was erected in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square during the 1989 demonstrations and crackdown.
The latest outbreak of discontent represents yet another headache for Beijing, after Chinese President Hu Jintao appealed in July for Hong Kong to maintain unity, with Beijing’s own leaders grappling with an imminent leadership transition.
Source
Power to Hong Kong! 
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thepeoplesrecord:

Hong Kong backs down on China education plan after protests
September 9, 2012

Hong Kong’s government withdrew plans for a compulsory Chinese school curriculum on Saturday after tens of thousands took to the streets in protest at what they said was a move to “brainwash” students.

The decision by the island’s pro-China Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying to make the curriculum voluntary for schools came a day before elections for just over half the seats of Hong Kong’s 70-seat legislature.

“We don’t want the recent controversy to affect the operations of schools, nor do we want to see the harmony of the education environment to be affected,” said Leung, noting the move was a “major policy amendment”.

“They have made a substantive concession,” said Joseph Wong, a former senior government official and political scientist.

“One may say it’s too late, but better late than never. I think it will defuse the issue, maybe not entirely, but at least it will remove a lot of the tensions … This is a great day for Hong Kong’s civil society.”

For the past week, thousands of protesters have ringed Hong Kong’s government headquarters, camped out in tents, dressed in black and chanting for the withdrawal of the curriculum they said was Communist Party propaganda aimed at indoctrinating new generations of primary and secondary school students.

The education issue is one of several key issues for voters along with housing and the increasing number of visitors from the mainland coming into the city.

DEMOCRACY CAMP

Leung was sworn in in July after being elected by a committee filled with business professionals, tycoons and Beijing loyalists. Hong Kong’s seven million people have no say in who becomes their chief executive.

A strong showing by the opposition pro-democracy camp would make it more difficult for the chief executive to pass policies in a fractious legislature.

The polls may be a chance for voters to express anti-China sentiment, with many protesters still camped outside the government headquarters after the apparent back-down, still unsatisfied with the policy change.

“This is a cunning move to put the ball in the people’s court. Even though they say schools are free to choose … in the coming years I expect the government and Beijing to use hidden means to try to pressure more and more schools to take up the scheme,” said young activist Mak Chi-ho.

“What Hong Kong needs is real universal suffrage.”

Hong Kong is a freewheeling capitalist hub which enjoys a high degree of autonomy, but Beijing has resisted public pressure for full democracy and has maintained a high degree of influence in political, media and academic spheres.

The past week’s protests have included hunger strikes and the parading of a replica of the Goddess of Democracy statue which was erected in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square during the 1989 demonstrations and crackdown.

The latest outbreak of discontent represents yet another headache for Beijing, after Chinese President Hu Jintao appealed in July for Hong Kong to maintain unity, with Beijing’s own leaders grappling with an imminent leadership transition.

Source

Power to Hong Kong! 

5 Countries the US Is Royally Screwing Over

queer-bolshevik:

Also known as, “What Hope and Change?”

1. Yemen - Drone strikes and funding the suppression of the Arab Spring

After 9/11 the Bush administration intensified support for Yemeni president Ali Abdullah Saleh, who was in power for over 30 years. This support was mostly security assistance under Bush, with and exchange of military equipment and one drone strike.

HOWEVER the Obama administration sent many more drone strikes, with a promise from Saleh that his military would take the blame for the strikes. Instead of pacifying militant Islamist groups (the supposed goal of drone strikes in the region) the violence only angered these groups more.

Furthermore, the Central Security Force of Yemen was funded and trained by the US to counter terrorism, but those guns were also responsible for the suppression of the revolutionaries during the Arab Spring.

2. Somalia - Drone strikes, invasion, and extremist reaction

In 2006 the Bush administration pushed Ethiopia to invade Somalia in response to the increased power of Somalia’s Union of Islamic Courts. This invasion resulted in 20,000 deaths and up to 2 million homeless Somalis.

The Obama administration’s increase of drone strikes also hit Somalia, leading more Somalis to join the radical Islamic group Al Shabab, which controls a third to a half of the country and was responsible for the confiscation of many food aid packages from the UN. Other factional fighting, which is responsible for the famine and poverty that plagues Somalia, has also intensified thanks to the drone strikes.

3. Honduras - Coup, trained slaughtering police

The elected leftist president Manuel Zeyala found his election cut short after three years with a coup in 2009. Committed to such actions as free education and lessening poverty, Zeyala should be a natural ally of the supposedly like-minded president Obama. But after a short period of condemnation of the coup Obama and his administration started to support post-coup president Porfirio Lobo, whose government has carried out massive violence against political opposition, journalist, and small farmers.

Obama’s response? Ask for more money to fight the drug war in Honduras. The war on drugs, which by no means is confined to Honduras, has led to the US forces militarizing the Honduran police, with such consequences as an attack on a boat supposedly carrying drugs but instead carrying passengers. With four innocent villagers left dead, including two pregnant women, animosity towards the police and the US only intensified.

4. Mexico - Police and military kill and torture, increase in drug violence

Similarly to the situation in Honduras, the Bush administration worked with Mexican security forces under the Merida Initiative, working on “fighting the drug war” by spending billions of dollars on training the federal police and military. However these same forces have participated in murder and torture, among other human rights violations. And counter to the intended effect, drug-related violence has gone up, not down.

So what did the Obama administration do? Extend the Merida Initiative indefinitely. The total death toll from drug-related violence is estimated at 50,000 as a result of fighting fire with US-backed fire.

5. Pakistan - Drone strike central, undermining democracy

The Bush administration sent 44 drone strikes to Pakistan; the Obama administration sent over 300. The intended target is the Taliban, which has been hit, but the drones also have killed an appalling number of civilians. Between 500 and 900 civilians have been killed, over 1000 injured. The democratic government looks like a joke for legislating against drone strikes and having no power to do anything about them. 

And what is the stated purpose of drone strikes in Pakistan? Spreading democracy.

(Source: fabulous-trotskyist, via amodernmanifesto)

thepeoplesrecord:

Thousands gathered in Sri Lanka on Aug. 24 to demand free education and an improvement in public universities. Teachers unions, parent associations, student groups & public sector unions marched in the protest that called for at least 6 percent of the GDP to be allocated to education. 
The Federation of University Teachers’ Association organized a strike on July 4 demanding better salaries & education reform. 
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thepeoplesrecord:

Thousands gathered in Sri Lanka on Aug. 24 to demand free education and an improvement in public universities. Teachers unions, parent associations, student groups & public sector unions marched in the protest that called for at least 6 percent of the GDP to be allocated to education. 

The Federation of University Teachers’ Association organized a strike on July 4 demanding better salaries & education reform. 

thepeoplesrecord:

Bahrain activist Nabeel Rajab jailed for two yearsAugust 21, 2012
Prominent Bahraini human rights activist Nabeel Rajab has been jailed for three years for taking part in “illegal gatherings”.
He is already serving a three-month sentence he received in July over comments on social networking websites.
Mr Rajab, president of the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights, had previously been detained several times.
He was one of the organisers of pro-democracy protests which have rocked the Gulf kingdom since last February.
Mr Rajab’s lawyer Mohammed al-Jishi said three year-long sentences had been handed down on three separate counts.
Mr Jishi said he plans to appeal against the ruling.
Fellow activists immediately condemned the decision, with some members of the protest movement calling for demonstrations on Thursday evening.
Mr Rajab’s sentence in July came after prosecutors received complaints that he had libelled residents of the town of Muharraq on Twitter.
He wrote on Twitter, where he has more than 155,000 followers, that Prime Minister Sheikh Khalifa bin Salman al-Khalifa should step down, and that Muharraq residents had only welcomed him during a visit because he had offered them subsidies.
Mr Rajab’s appeal in that case has been deferred to 23 August, according to Mr Jishi.
Last week, several members of the US Congress wrote to the Bahraini King Hamad al-Khalifa expressing concern over Mr Rajab’s case and urging the release of “Bahrainis being held for crimes related to freedom of expression”.
Source
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thepeoplesrecord:

Bahrain activist Nabeel Rajab jailed for two years
August 21, 2012

Prominent Bahraini human rights activist Nabeel Rajab has been jailed for three years for taking part in “illegal gatherings”.

He is already serving a three-month sentence he received in July over comments on social networking websites.

Mr Rajab, president of the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights, had previously been detained several times.

He was one of the organisers of pro-democracy protests which have rocked the Gulf kingdom since last February.

Mr Rajab’s lawyer Mohammed al-Jishi said three year-long sentences had been handed down on three separate counts.

Mr Jishi said he plans to appeal against the ruling.

Fellow activists immediately condemned the decision, with some members of the protest movement calling for demonstrations on Thursday evening.

Mr Rajab’s sentence in July came after prosecutors received complaints that he had libelled residents of the town of Muharraq on Twitter.

He wrote on Twitter, where he has more than 155,000 followers, that Prime Minister Sheikh Khalifa bin Salman al-Khalifa should step down, and that Muharraq residents had only welcomed him during a visit because he had offered them subsidies.

Mr Rajab’s appeal in that case has been deferred to 23 August, according to Mr Jishi.

Last week, several members of the US Congress wrote to the Bahraini King Hamad al-Khalifa expressing concern over Mr Rajab’s case and urging the release of “Bahrainis being held for crimes related to freedom of expression”.

Source