Ⓐ ☭ Ⓔ
menos violencia, más orgasmos.

thepeoplesrecord:

Occupy Wall Street taught many middle-class white people what poor people and people of color had already known. The law is often a hostile and arbitrary thing. Speak too loudly, stand in the wrong place, and you’re on the wrong side of it. My experience was infinitely easier than most. Many people arrested came out to a lost job, or they have to deal with nerve-damaged hands from being in cuffs for too long, or they face a society that believes they asked for it.

While we were in the cell, after we banged too long and chanted too hard, an officer stared at us. “Look at you people,” she said. “What do you hope to accomplish? You brought this on yourselves.”

Read artist Molly Crabapple’s full article on her experience at Occupy Wall Street here. 

thepeoplesrecord:

OWS march rolls through Charlotte ahead of DNCSeptember 2, 2012
Hundreds of people have taken part in the March on Wall Street South event in Charlotte, carrying banners, banging drums and chanting slogans against corporate greed. The protest ahead of the Democratic National Convention proceeded peacefully.
The turnout at the event was lower than organizers had expected, with only about 1,000 activists from dozens of groups marching through the city center on Sunday.
Small groups of protesters made stops along their way to stage sit-ins in front of Bank of America headquarters and power utility Duke Energy.
The march drew people protesting against a variety of causes in addition to corporate collusion with the US government. Along with slogans like “Capitalism is holding back the human race,” and “Bail out people, not banks,” protesters were bearing signs saying “No war on Iran” and “Obama murders children with drones.”
About 100 police officers walked alongside the protesters, with a helicopter hovering above the crowd. They carried wooden batons, plastic hand ties and gas masks, but did not use them as the event went smoothly.
Only one person was arrested during the march, for intoxication, police said.
The parade route and “free speech” areas were designated by the authorities well in advance. The city also assigned time slots for speaking and marches. 
Official events tied to the official Democratic National Convention begin on Tuesday, but Charlotte authorities bolstered up security well ahead. They introduced new rules, according to which a person can face arrest for carrying water bottles, socks, markers, and other seemingly unthreatening items.
Although the organizers consider the turnout at Sunday’s event to be a success, the movement is likely to grow further over the next few days, drawing larger crowds than those seen in Tampa during the Republican National Convention, historian Gerald Horne told RT.
“I think that Charlotte does not have the problem that Tampa had with regard to an impending hurricane,” he said.“Likewise I think there is a community in North Carolina that is very much interested in raising questions concerning the war in Afghanistan, the US intervention in Syria, the debacle that was effectuated in Libya, and of course what is hanging over us all, an impending attack on Iran that may take place before the first Tuesday of November, that is to say, may take place before the US election.”
SourcePhoto
View high resolution

thepeoplesrecord:

OWS march rolls through Charlotte ahead of DNC
September 2, 2012

Hundreds of people have taken part in the March on Wall Street South event in Charlotte, carrying banners, banging drums and chanting slogans against corporate greed. The protest ahead of the Democratic National Convention proceeded peacefully.

The turnout at the event was lower than organizers had expected, with only about 1,000 activists from dozens of groups marching through the city center on Sunday.

Small groups of protesters made stops along their way to stage sit-ins in front of Bank of America headquarters and power utility Duke Energy.

The march drew people protesting against a variety of causes in addition to corporate collusion with the US government. Along with slogans like “Capitalism is holding back the human race,” and “Bail out people, not banks,” protesters were bearing signs saying “No war on Iran” and “Obama murders children with drones.”

About 100 police officers walked alongside the protesters, with a helicopter hovering above the crowd. They carried wooden batons, plastic hand ties and gas masks, but did not use them as the event went smoothly.

Only one person was arrested during the march, for intoxication, police said.

The parade route and “free speech” areas were designated by the authorities well in advance. The city also assigned time slots for speaking and marches. 

Official events tied to the official Democratic National Convention begin on Tuesday, but Charlotte authorities bolstered up security well ahead. They introduced new rules, according to which a person can face arrest for carrying water bottles, socks, markers, and other seemingly unthreatening items.

Although the organizers consider the turnout at Sunday’s event to be a success, the movement is likely to grow further over the next few days, drawing larger crowds than those seen in Tampa during the Republican National Convention, historian Gerald Horne told RT.

“I think that Charlotte does not have the problem that Tampa had with regard to an impending hurricane,” he said.“Likewise I think there is a community in North Carolina that is very much interested in raising questions concerning the war in Afghanistan, the US intervention in Syria, the debacle that was effectuated in Libya, and of course what is hanging over us all, an impending attack on Iran that may take place before the first Tuesday of November, that is to say, may take place before the US election.”

Source
Photo

thepeoplesrecord:

Chilean students continue fight for education in escalating protests
August 24, 2012

Over the past year, Chilean students have been protesting for education reform. Hundreds of students—mostly in their teens— have taken over schools in Santiago. High school entrances and traffic have been blocked in Chile’s capital.

Despite promises from President Sebastian Pinera, protestors complain that not much change has happened.  45% of families who can’t afford private schools have to settle with poor quality public schools. Others attend private schools for both secondary school and university. However, these private institutions are becoming too expensive so families have to get loans with interest rates too high to pay off.

“It is a direct assault on public education and on the chance to advance towards ending inequality in Chile,” said Student Leader Camila Vallejo.

For the several past months, student protests have been getting louder and more violent. The protesters are demanding free, high-quality education for all without central government control inside of public schools. Students have taken over several schools and damaged city property. Recently, three city buses were set on fire, injuring many people.

“If we’re coming to this extreme-this level of anger among students-it’s because this government has been unable to have a dialogue and give us any answers,” said Gabriel Boric, President of the University of Chile Student Federation.

In response the police took violent actions against the students as well. They have used water cannons to disassemble marches. They stormed into three secondary schools and detained over a hundred students. Santiago’s Mayor, Pablo Zalaquett, threatened to take away scholarships from students who take part in the protest.

Government spokesman Andres Chadwick supported the violent actions of the police. He stated, “”We reject the violence of a small group of students who occupy those schools, often wearing balaclavas. Their sole purpose is to disrupt… classes and normal life.”

Source
Photos

Chile is truly inspiring! Additional note: 113 people were arrested in these protest events. 

(via )

anarcho-queer:

New York Times Says NYPD Brutalized A Photographer

The New York Times has complained to the city’s police department after one of its photographers said he was assaulted by officers who arrested him on Saturday.

Robert Stolarik, a freelance photographer, claimed a New York Police Department (NYPD) officer “slammed” his camera into his face before he was dragged to the ground, kicked and arrested.

Stolarik was on assignment with two other reporters in the Bronx when he was stopped by police on Saturday evening.

Police ordered Stolarik to stop taking pictures of a teenage girl being arrested. When he refused, an officer reputedly grabbed Stolarik’s camera and dragged him to the ground.

Stolarik claimed he was then kicked in the back and received scrapes and bruises on his face, legs and arms as a result of the arrest. He was charged with obstructing government administration and of resisting arrest.

The New York Times reported that a video of the arrest taken by another journalist showed Stolarik face down on the pavement beneath a huddle of about six police officers.

The police claimed that Stolarik “inadvertently” struck an officer in the face with his camera when he refused to leave the scene and stop taking photographs. A spokesman for the NYPD said the force had no further comment to make on Monday.

It is the third time since December the paper has written to the force about its treatment of Stolarik, who covered the Occupy Wall Street protests for the New York Times.

Police obstructed Stolarik from taking pictures of an arrest at an Occupy Wall Street rally in December 2011, and again in January. View high resolution

anarcho-queer:

New York Times Says NYPD Brutalized A Photographer

The New York Times has complained to the city’s police department after one of its photographers said he was assaulted by officers who arrested him on Saturday.

Robert Stolarik, a freelance photographer, claimed a New York Police Department (NYPD) officer “slammed” his camera into his face before he was dragged to the ground, kicked and arrested.

Stolarik was on assignment with two other reporters in the Bronx when he was stopped by police on Saturday evening.

Police ordered Stolarik to stop taking pictures of a teenage girl being arrested. When he refused, an officer reputedly grabbed Stolarik’s camera and dragged him to the ground.

Stolarik claimed he was then kicked in the back and received scrapes and bruises on his face, legs and arms as a result of the arrest. He was charged with obstructing government administration and of resisting arrest.

The New York Times reported that a video of the arrest taken by another journalist showed Stolarik face down on the pavement beneath a huddle of about six police officers.

The police claimed that Stolarik “inadvertently” struck an officer in the face with his camera when he refused to leave the scene and stop taking photographs. A spokesman for the NYPD said the force had no further comment to make on Monday.

It is the third time since December the paper has written to the force about its treatment of Stolarik, who covered the Occupy Wall Street protests for the New York Times.

Police obstructed Stolarik from taking pictures of an arrest at an Occupy Wall Street rally in December 2011, and again in January.